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Thread: Dr Malcolm Kendrick continues his . . .

  1. #51

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    more on the Statins debate from Dr Malcolm Kendrick.
    Gilli - DLTBGYD but more importantly KCHO

  2. #52
    Super Member Mamie's Avatar
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    My friend rang to tell me about this news item but I was out so couldn't watch it. Glad to been able to do so now.
    Thanks, Gill.

  3. #53
    Super Member roseymary's Avatar
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    My highly educated and I used to think intelligent brother wrote this after I'd forwarded the email to him "I don’t understand all the statistical analysis in the article so I will stick to my doctor’s advice until there is clear evidence one way or the other. I suspect that your genes play the biggest part in how we are going to snuff it."

    I've loaned him books debunking cholesterol/statins but he has total belief in the current medical advice.

    I despair and give up on him.
    One is too many a thousand not enough.

  4. #54

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    So frustrating RM!!
    Gilli - DLTBGYD but more importantly KCHO

  5. #55
    Super Member Mamie's Avatar
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    But, sadly, not unusual.

  6. #56

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    Ep40 Dr Malcolm Kendrick: the True Causes of Heart Disease are Not What You Think!
    This is quite a long detailed look at what Dr Kendrick has been saying over the years I've been following him.
    For newbies to Dr Kendricks work it may help to also look at the notes Ivor has put here
    INDEX/CONTENTS: and below that TRANSCRIPT:
    It may help some people to read the transcript as they listen to the podcast.

    When they are talking about sunlight/vitamin d and the endothelium do remember that it's the Cholecalciferol form of vitamin d3 in serum that is stabilising the endothelium. The half-life of the cholecalciferol form of vitamin d3 in serum is just 24 hours. which is why it is quickly converted to calcidiol the storage form before being converted to the hormonal form calcitriol. It was thought that cholecalciferol was inert, inactive in that form which is why some doctors persist in prescribing it weekly or monthly, but Dietary Vitamin D and Its Metabolites Non-Genomically Stabilize the Endothelium this paper shows it performs vital functions in that most basic form which is why we need DAILY sun exposure or daily vitamin d3 dosing if we want to ensure the stabilzation of the endothelium can be maintained 24/7. To keep significant measurable amounts of cholecalciferol in serum also requires 25(OH)D to be kept at the natural level for humans in the 40-60ng/ml 100 - 150nmol/l range. If you know you have a problem with inflammation (or autoimmune condition) then 50-80 ng/ml 125-200nmol/l may be better Vitamin d requires the presence of magnesium for it's activation and retention and many modern processed foods lack magnesium, and many of us have lower omega 3 intakes than are ideal so boosting magnesium and omega 3 (in the context of reducing omega 6 seed/grain oil intake) makes sense.
    Last edited by TedHutchinson; 24th September 2019 at 10:52 PM.

  7. #57

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    Ted that is really helpful, thank you.

    Dr Kendrick's latest blog on Cardiovascular disease was published yesterday and can be found here.

    I can see that all my links seem to return to the latest blog so Ted's links are particularly helpful.
    Gilli - DLTBGYD but more importantly KCHO

  8. #58

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gilli View Post
    Dr Kendrick's latest blog on Cardiovascular disease was published yesterday and can be found here.
    Lead exposure or build up is also associated with loss of cognitive function which is a potential concern for those here of my age and above.
    one of the points Dr Rhonda Patrick makes in relation to the use of sauna therapy relates to the
    Excretion of heavy metals (cadmium and mercury, both of which are better excreted in sweat compare to urine)

    There is more detail on this here
    Components of Practical Clinical Detox Programs—Sauna as a Therapeutic Tool Walter Crinnion, ND
    working up a sweat (using the exercise cycle machines for 15 minutes prior to sauna may improve action.

    Combined effects of repeated sauna therapy and exercise training on cardiac function and physical activity in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Dietary Strategies for the Treatment of Cadmium and Lead Toxicity
    Garlic, ginger and onion are used as ingredients for flavour, aroma and taste enhancement all over the world. Garlic is also a well known medicinal plant. Garlic extract alleviates Pb-induced neural, hepatic, renal and haematic toxicity in rats and protects against Cd-induced mitochondrial injury and apoptosis in tissue culture models [73,74,75,76]. Based on these studies, garlic’s protective property against Cd and Pb toxicity can be attributed to (1) its antioxidative ability, provided by organo-sulphur compounds such as diallyl tetrasulfide; (2) its chelation ability, provided by sulphur-containing amino acids and compounds with free carboxyl and amino groups, which in turn promotes the excretion of Pb or Cd from the body; and (3) the prevention of Cd and Pb intestinal absorption, by its sulphur-containing amino acids such as S-allyl cysteine and S-allyl mercaptocysteine. Ginger and onion have similar antioxidant capacities to garlic, and supplementation with these food ingredients gave protection against Pb-induced renal and developmental toxicity and Cd-induced gonadotoxic and spermiotoxic effects in rats [77,78,79].
    A mini review: garlic extract and vascular diseases

    EDIT
    As it's a wet day and I've a good excuse to stay indoors I'm listening to the Kendrick Cummins podcast again.

    Just got to the McCully KS section at point 00.41:20 in the transcript and was quite interested to see what McCully KS was up to now.

    Chemical Pathology of Homocysteine VII. Cholesterol, Thioretinaco Ozonide, Mitochondrial Dysfunction, and Prevention of Mortality.
    The purpose of this review is to elucidate how low blood cholesterol promotes mitochondrial dysfunction and mortality by the loss of thioretinaco ozonide from opening of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP).
    Mortality from infections and cancer are both inversely associated with blood cholesterol, as determined by multiple cohort studies from 10 to 30 years earlier.
    Moreover, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is inversely related to all-cause and/or cardiovascular mortality, as determined by followup study of elderly cohorts.
    LDL adheres to and inactivates most microorganisms and their toxins, causing aggregation of LDL and homocysteinylated autoantibodies which obstruct vasa vasorum and produce intimal microabscesses, the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques.
    The active site of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and adenosine triphosphate (ATP) biosynthesis is proposed to consist of thioretinaco, a complex of two molecules of thioretinamide with cobalamin, oxidized to the disulfonium thioretinaco ozonide and complexed with oxygen, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+), phosphate, and ATP.
    Loss of the active site complex from mitochondria results from the opening of the mPTP and from decomposition of the disulfonium active site by electrophilic carcinogens, oncogenic viruses, microbes, and by reactive oxygen radicals from ionizing and non-ionizing radiation.
    Suppression of innate immunity is caused by the depletion of adenosyl methionine because of increased polyamine biosynthesis, resulting in inhibition of nitric oxide and peroxynitrite biosynthesis.
    Opening of the mPTP produces a loss of thioretinaco ozonide from mitochondria.
    This loss impairs ATP biosynthesis and causes the mitochondrial dysfunction observed in carcinogenesis, atherosclerosis, aging and dementia.
    Cholesterol inhibits the opening of the mPTP by preventing integration of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-associated X protein (BAX) in the outer mitochondrial membrane.
    This inhibition explains how elevated LDL reduces mitochondrial dysfunction by preventing loss of the active site of oxidative phosphorylation from mitochondria.

    So why hasn't this been splashed all over the national press headlines?
    I think we can guess why?
    Last edited by TedHutchinson; 25th September 2019 at 12:49 PM.

  9. #59
    Gilli - DLTBGYD but more importantly KCHO

  10. #60

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    Wow, I never knew lead was that harmful.

    I'm glad it has been removed from petrol as I live close to a busy main road.

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