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Thread: Council promoting meatless Mondays

  1. #1
    Super Member roseymary's Avatar
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    Default Council promoting meatless Mondays

    At least only on council sites, but I guessing the next step is local restaurants. Knee jerk reaction to bad science.

    https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-08-...ustry/11427866
    One is too many a thousand not enough.

  2. #2

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    That would make me order steak on a Monday and complain when it wasn't served! The school children and hospital patients who have no choice where they eat will surely be the most affected.

    If I had to eat on a council site on a Monday I would take a packed lunch. But then, actually, I have taken a packed lunch to work for so long that I would take one every day anyway. Will they police those? If so, two words come to mind - "Judicial Review" - because I think that forcing people to eat in a particular way would be "Wednesbury unreasonable" and can you imagine the uproar if vegetarians or vegans were obliged to eat meat one day per week!!
    Gilli - DLTBGYD but more importantly KCHO

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    Super Member roseymary's Avatar
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    Gilli - yes Vs. would be ropeable if the boot was on the other foot.

    Hospitals thank goodness are not governed by local government, but I can see this spreading.
    One is too many a thousand not enough.

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    This is as bad as fish on Fridays. Schools had fish on Fridays because Friday was a religious fasting day from eating meat but fish was permitted.

    https://www.kencollins.com/answers/question-38.htm

    Now we have fasting from meat on a Monday but for different reasons unless climate change has become a religion, for some.

    I would also follow Gilli and have a meat filled lunchbox if working and a big steak for dinner on a Monday. I do have a bit of a rebel inside me.

    Hospital meals are nearly meat and fish free free anyway, so they would not have to make any change.

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    Super Member Mamie's Avatar
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    It makes me feel like screaming and I totally agree with Gilli about the uproar that would ensue if veggies and vegans had to eat meat once a week. I suppose their argument would be that most meat eaters also eat non meat foods but anything that forces one groups ideas onto others smacks of social engineering.

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    Club Member Hugh Mannity's Avatar
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    I heard an Aussie cattle farmer on the BBC World Service responding to being questioned as whether he should shift to raising grains tell the questioner that not only was his land not suited to arable farming, but that running cattle on it improved the soil.

    So a double whammy against monocropping grains everywhere.

    As for meatless Mondays, they can just stay out of my kitchen

  7. #7
    Super Member Mamie's Avatar
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    The unsuitability of land for arable farming applies to huge swathes of the British Isles as well Hugh.

  8. #8

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    It really is a two edged sword. If farmers on marginal land stopped grazing on the moors and mountains the landscape we know in England, Wales and Scotland would change. I think that there is a belief that these places would rapidly become aforested as first scrub then birch trees and finally larger trees moved in but although this might happen in some places I do not believe it would be either universal or a good thing. I was reading Wilding by Isabella Tree, which I must finish - perhaps at the weekend if we have sitting out in a deckchair sunshine.

    In many areas the existence of soil at all has been thanks to generations of cattle, sheep and horses turned out to graze or resident and hefted on the land throughout the year. If you remove those animals it is more likely that sudden deluges (which seem to be occurring more often - possibly an indicator of climate change) will strip the soil down to bare rock because there will be scrub plants to be "pushed or pulled" by the flow of water and the precious top soil will end up in our rivers and flowing out to sea rather than sustaining the grass and the grazing animals.

    I have ordered a new book called The Earth Care Manual: A Permaculture Handbook for Britain and Other Temperate Climates

    by Patrick Whitefield which I hope will tell me more about how regenerative planting can help improve the environment whilst keeping it productive but I would be very surprised if he does not rely on a lot of animal inputs to his systems because that is how all life works.
    Gilli - DLTBGYD but more importantly KCHO

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    Super Member Mamie's Avatar
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    Its so naive of the "eat only plants" brigade to believe that its all very simple. They are not thinking it through.

  10. #10

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    I think you are right Mamie, but it seems to me to be wilful naivety, they simply do not want to know the whole picture.
    Gilli - DLTBGYD but more importantly KCHO

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