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Thread: Dietary Carbohydrate Promotes Cell Survival in Cancer

  1. #1

    Default Dietary Carbohydrate Promotes Cell Survival in Cancer

    Dietary Carbohydrate Promotes Cell Survival in Cancer Via the Up-Regulation of Fat Mass and Obesity-Associated Gene Expression Level.

    Conclusion
    Cancer cells are dependent on glycolysis for their growth and proliferation.
    Dietary carbohydrate is a significant factor and the association between blood glucose levels and cancer is well documented. But the exact mechanisms of this relationship remain unclear.
    Recent studies showed that dietary macronutrients may have an impact on cancer by altering the expression level of the genes associated with the metabolism of cancer cells (such as FTO).
    If we could improve the expression levels of the genes involved in growth, metabolism, and the function of cancer cells through changing our diet, we can hope to find a nutritionally applicable solution for the treatment and control of cancer in the future.
    Further research on the exact mechanism of the influence of FTO gene on the growth and proliferation of cancer cells may clarify the importance of this issue and the possibility of therapeutic use of dietary components in cancer.

  2. #2

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    JOHN NEWMAN DISCUSSES HOW THE KETOGENIC DIET AND FASTING REGULATE THE GENES AND PATHWAYS THAT CONTROL AGING
    I listened to this Stem Talk Podcast last night which talks about the role of fasting and a ketogenic diet in relation to regulating genes.
    It may be that avoiding refined and processed carbohydrates not only promotes survival in cancer patients but also activates the genes that promote repair and healing.

  3. #3
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    This falls in line with the advice when it was thought I had cancer 3 times. Whilst waiting for the results the first time I was told to cut considerable my carb intake with emphasise on sugar, which for me was easy, I started with Atkins. The second and third time, I had continued to follow low carb and just cut back even further on carbs as far as I could. In between I found Harcombe which makes the whole so easy.

    I have been fasting during August for the first time by eating as early as possible my evening meal (to fit in with Hubby) and not eating again until after 1pm the following day.

    If it is found that this really helps, it is easiest way of people to assist in their own survival or at least slow the spread to snails pace.

    I have just had my 4th fast track MRI scan this time on my eyes, as my right eye is protruding from the socket and there was a need to find out if there was some pathology behind the eye. I had the results last week in a letter and there is not, now I am waiting for an appointment, shortly, to go back to see the consultant. I am sure my diet is protecting me not necessarily from cancer but my general fitness to help me cope with whatever my body throws at me.

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    Forum Guest Ffion's Avatar
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    I'm really struggling to feed the OH. He's been told prostate cancer's main foodstuffs are fat and protein and in no way should he be on a ketogenic diet. On the other hand, once pc goes rogue and metastasises, it also uses sugar. So, my question is, what on earth do I feed him? IGF-1 in dairy and meat are horrifically bad for advanced prostate cancer.

    Intermittent fasting seems like a good move (to me, at least, and it has been proved to reduce IGF-1 temporarily) but otherwise we're down to legumes and veg. I'm running out of ideas, especially ideas that don't involve lentils and aubergines ...

  5. #5

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    Sorry to hear that Ffion, that might be an ask Zoe question as I am sure she will be able to point you to some research.

    Why is meat considered bad? I can almost understand the dairy as although I love it there are a lot of paleo people out there who talk convincingly about hormones and inflammation with regards to dairy but you can be keto or low carb and no dairy you just need to eat lots of nuts and cocunut milk/oil etc

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    Forum Guest Ffion's Avatar
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    Even Prostate Cancer UK says meat isn't good for prostate cancer, and they're of the Eatwell Plate persuasion usually. It's to do with growth hormones apparently, and certain cancers are driven by excess IGF-1. I bought all the books on keto for cancer, and even in there they say the diet's not suitable for prostate cancer, as pc is driven by fatty acids and glutamine rather than the more normal glucose (until it gets to late stage, and then it uses all three food sources). So the excess oil (whatever type) isn't good either. There's a limit to what you can do with chick peas and lentils (and I think I may have reached it!)

    There's all sorts of conflicting info about fish oil, and therefore oily fish, being good or absolutely terrible for pc, but given the fat connection, even that seems to be contraindicated.

    I think I could do with more imagination in the cookery department!

  7. #7

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    Unfortunately the research relating to diet and cancer is scarce and heavily influenced (biased) by current dietary guidelines.
    Here is a recent small study that may help but most of the keto cancer research is on mice which is not ideal.A lifestyle intervention of weight loss via a low-carbohydrate diet plus walking to reduce metabolic disturbances caused by androgen deprivation therapy among prostate cancer patients: carbohydrate and prostate study 1 (CAPS1) randomized controlled trial

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    Forum Guest Ffion's Avatar
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    Thanks, Ted.

  9. #9

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    Dietary restriction during the treatment of cancer: results of a systematic scoping review
    This open access paper provides a summary of recent research however it's disappointing there is so little.
    We live in an age where online monitoring of diets by uploading photos of each meal consumed is part of the way of life for many people.
    There must be plenty of people who do this regularly who would be pleased to see their photos used for cancer research.
    It should be a fairly simple job to see if those maintaining ketosis or a daily carbohydrate intake 50g or under have better prognosis/survival than those with higher carb intakes?

  10. #10
    Forum Guest Ffion's Avatar
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    I think it depends on how your cancer works. I only know about prostate cancer which, unlike most of the others, prefers fats and protein to sugar. I wonder if you'd have to work out the cell metabolism of your particular type of cancer to judge the benefits of ketosis? The science is fascinating, once you get into it. I just wish I hadn't had to. PubMed has lots of information on it, but it's not straightforward, as metastasis, for example, can change the feeding needs of cancer cells.

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