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Thread: Interesting article...

  1. #1
    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    Default Interesting article...

    On BBC website. Not sure I agree with all of it, but some interesting bits.
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/articles/metabolism

  2. #2

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    Interesting - and again the glucose monitor and how foods cause glucose spikes in some people but not others.

    I do get cross about the “5 or 10 calories less (or more) every day” bit trotted out again, I’m sure it is garbage.
    Sue - the first "no thank you" is the easiest

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    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    I agree, but the comparison even of twins reacting differently to different foods is interesting - especially given Gilli’s carnivore-ish diet, and MrJDW caffeine issues.

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    It was an interesting article [but typically shallow as so much of the BBC’s output is these days].

    The missing ingredient, I think, is that losing weight does not need to lower your basal metabolic rate. If you lose weight by the government approved eat less do more low fat high carb approach you will follow the men on the Minnesota Starvation Experiment of the 1940s and lower your BMR.

    If, on the other hand, you eat real food to satiety and don’t attempt to artificially lower your intake by counting Calories ie you work with your appetite rather than trying to override it I do not think that BMR goes down in the same way. Whilst I accept that a 300lb body requires more energy output to run it than a 150lb body does, this is not the same as losing the 10lb or 10kg which is mentioned in the article. In Minnesota the men felt cold as well as hungry and their bodies were no longer able to carry out the necessary metabolic tasks on the Calorie restricted diet, but because of the food they were given they were not able to access their own body fat either. This is why fasting is better than long term restriction of Calories.
    Gilli - DLTBGYD but more importantly KCHO

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    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    It was more the differing responses to different foods I found interesting.

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    Super Member roseymary's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sarah(sjc) View Post
    It was more the differing responses to different foods I found interesting.
    Yes I agree Sarah, especially identical twins really struck me.

    The other paragraph I found interesting was
    As you lose this weight, your brain hates it”, he continues, “because it considers it as reducing your likelihood of surviving. Keep in mind we’ve evolved from a time when there was not enough food. So whenever you lose weight a red flag goes off in your brain and two things happen: it makes you more hungry and it lowers your metabolism slightly to try and drag
    . I know tresearch was done on one season on Biggest loser finalists, who all had permanently lowered BMR. I'd love to know if eating as we do where calories are not restricted has the same effect.
    One is too many a thousand not enough.

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    Quote Originally Posted by roseymary View Post
    Yes I agree Sarah, especially identical twins really struck me.

    The other paragraph I found interesting was . I know tresearch was done on one season on Biggest loser finalists, who all had permanently lowered BMR. I'd love to know if eating as we do where calories are not restricted has the same effect.
    I don’t think it does RM.

    I put on and lost weight with each pregnancy [four live children] each time I lost the weight by following lowfat guidelines my weight was then on a bit of a rollercoaster. Every time I relaxed my vigilence I would gain and then I would go back to rigid control and lose again. Since following Harcombe I have (apart from the Covid gain in April) pretty much maintained between bouts of losing whilst continuing to eat delicious, nutritious real food. If my BMR had gone down eating this way I think I would be riding that roller coaster rather than taking some stairs which keep taking me in a downward direction.
    Gilli - DLTBGYD but more importantly KCHO

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