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    Published on 7th December 2015 07:29 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Newsletter-Health,
    3. Newsletter-For Thought

    The five healthy behaviours that we don’t do

    This week’s story did not come from the newspapers, but it would make a great story. I have just sent the manuscript for my PhD to my supervisor and he’s reading through it now. There are likely still amends and then there’s the viva, but hopefully I’m on the home straight. One of the best bits about doing the research has been meeting one of the original lead researchers in the field of dietary trials: Professor Peter Elwood. Peter was involved in the Diet And Reinfarction Trial (known as the DART study) and the Caerphilly observational study. He was thus instrumental in both a randomised controlled trial and what we call an epidemiological study. Peter is an emeritus professor at Cardiff University and he still has an office there, years beyond retirement age for most people. He is a personal picture of health if you’re interested.

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    1. Categories:
    2. Videos-Conferences

    Prof. Tim Noakes explains in detail why and when he learnt to switch his advice for athletes
    To view full screen, just click the little icon at the bottom right hand corner of the video

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    Published on 30th November 2015 07:27 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Newsletter-Health,
    3. Newsletter-Bad Science

    Portion sizes – by guesswork or by nutrients?

    The diet and health story that caught my eye last week was very visual. The Daily Mail’s “Good Health” had asked dietician Sian Porter to come up with a visual guide to portion sizes. You can see the visual here. The guidelines that she invented were:


    - Meat & oily fish portions should be the size of the palm of your hand;


    - White fish portions should be the size of the whole hand;

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    1. Categories:
    2. Recipes-Phase 2 Fat Meals,
    3. Recipes-Beef

    Beef BourguignonBeef Bourguignon
    This is a really simple version of the French classic. This dish can be done as a ‘cooking in a hurry meal’ if you have a slow-cooker. You can put the slow-cooker on the lowest setting before work and return home to a rich aroma and delicious casserole.
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    Published on 23rd November 2015 08:15 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Newsletter-Dieting,
    3. Newsletter-For Thought

    Two doctors in the house

    On Tuesday 17th November, there was a programme on Channel 4 called “Doctor in your house”. The doctor was Dr. Xand van Tulleken, one of the twin brothers who have done many engaging health programmes on UK TV. Xand was joined by Dr. Ellie – a regular spokesperson on Sky TV.


    On Thursday 19th November, there was a programme on BBC1 called “Doctor in the house”. The doctor was Dr. Rangan Chatterjee, a new face on British television, although I caught him on BBC breakfast a couple of weeks ago talking about low carb diets and I thought “wow – here’s one to watch.”

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    Published on 16th November 2015 07:20 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Newsletter-Conflicts,
    3. Newsletter-Health

    World Diabetes Day

    Saturday November 14th was World Diabetes Day. The International Diabetes Federation (IDF) defines diabetes as follows:


    "Diabetes mellitus, or simply diabetes, is a chronic disease that occurs when the pancreas is no longer able to make insulin, or when the body cannot make good use of the insulin it produces. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas, that acts like a key to let glucose from the food we eat pass from the blood stream into the cells in the body to produce energy. All carbohydrate foods are broken down into glucose in the blood. Insulin helps glucose get into the cells.

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    Published on 9th November 2015 07:39 PM
    1. Categories:
    2. Newsletter-Health,
    3. Newsletter-For Thought

    How does a 6 year old become 8 stone?

    During the October half term holidays, a mum appeared on breakfast TV’s “This Morning” show, under the name of ‘Jane’. She was there to support proposals for an annual school health check to detect obesity as early as possible.


    Jane’s real name turned out to be Sam and her six year old boy, Kardel, was the reason Sam was supportive of the idea of an MoT. Sam thought that such a checkup could prevent other families from getting into the same situation as she found herself: with a six year old who weighed eight stone.*

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