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Thread: Thin people

  1. #11
    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    To be fair to my friends, they rarely eat processed food and even less often takeaways, being of that generation that grew up without either. My aunt has a family history of stroke and is on statins - fortunately, without side effects. I said in my first post, it's those people who eat large amounts without gaining (or losing weight) that interest me in this discussion, not people who maintain a low weight through obsessive exercise and diet, or have eating disorders. It also occurs to me that these are usually people who have a healthy relationship with food, they don't obsess about what's not available, or binge etc.

    No, they wouldn't have eaten at lunchtime, but were planning supper as they left - they aren't the sort to miss meals. They don't snack - to be honest, that is the biggest difference I can see. My aunt had parents built like her - tall and very slender - but I know very little about her partner (his father-in-law just died at 105, but he doesn't count).

    I'm not saying it's fair or unfair - just trying to make an objective observation, and also to see if there's something we can learn from them.

  2. #12

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    Thin people can turn into fat people as time goes by. I was a thin child - always the shortest and the skinniest in the class - who turned into a skinny teenager and a skinny adult. I never weighed more than 7 stone 10lbs until I hit my 30's and I did eat lots of chocolate during my early 20's (before I developed severe hypoglycaemia and cut back on my chocolate consumption temporarily). It was only as I got older that I started to gain weight and entered the world of yo yo dieting.
    3 stone gone forever! Gluten free phase 3.

  3. #13
    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    But not all skinny people become fat - at 75 my aunt (she was actually my Mum's best friend, and I have known her all my life) weighs 10 stone and is around 5'7" tall. I recall her Mum at 80+ as even slimmer, so I don't think she will gain weight now.

    There is something keeping her slim, and because she has always been slim, she has never developed the distorted relationship with food that the majority of people on this forum have had, or are still battling! I just think it's a shame research isn't also directed at finding out what it is, and if it might be of help to those trying to lose weight!

    Just downloading some Mark Sissons to Kindle - may very well have a crack at this next week or three!

  4. #14

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    There was a programme on tv a while ago that looked at this. They took naturally slim people and increased their calories dramatically and observed their eating and monitored their weight etc. I think all put on some weight but they all lost it very quickly after the experiment ended.

    One thing I have noticed about naturally slim people as that although they often say that they eat whatever they want, that doesn't tend to be the same thing as we mean when we talk about eating whatever we want. They don't tend to develop cravings for food or intolerances - I wonder whether there is a specific, biological reason why some of us develop these things and some don't?
    3 stone gone forever! Gluten free phase 3.

  5. #15
    Supermember 2010-14 Sian's Avatar
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    I used to be a naturally thin person until I started my first diet in 2003 at 8 stone 10! Ever since then I have binged periodically, usually in proportion to how strict the diet has been.

  6. #16
    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    I think you are right, and I think the three conditions addressed by THD are a part of this. However, by the time we have found THD, we have usually developed cravings and associations, and these exist on a psychological as well as physical level. Our confidence has been undermined by our weight and other issues, and we are also using food as a comfort and crutch. If we could identify how to avoid falling into this trap in the first place, it would be wonderful - if not for us, then maybe for our children!

    I think this may be another of the subjects that won't attract research funding as there is no profit in it, though!

  7. #17
    Supermember 2010-14 Sian's Avatar
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    I agree with you SJC and whilst I was 'naturally thin', I now have all the hang ups brought on by nearly 10 years of dieting! THD has freed me from the physical cravings and the psychological ones I am still working through.

    I think the key to avoiding it is to avoid getting overweight in the first place and never to go on a diet! Easier said than done probably...

  8. #18
    SuperMember 2013-16 Alix's Avatar
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    [QUOTE=sjc;143876]To be fair to my friends, they rarely eat processed food and even less often takeaways, being of that generation that grew up without either.[/QUOTE]

    That could be a large part of your answer right there - the obesity epidemic didn't really take off until people started eating large ammounts of processed foods. They also probably won't have cravings for processed foods for the same reasons.

  9. #19
    Club Member ninamarina's Avatar
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    I find this a really interesting discussion. I always think that naturally slim people just maybe have a 'mind over matter' atttude to food, Either that, or they just dont think about food as being interesting enough to give it more thought than necessary. They may be busier doing things that they may find having more priority than food. They may have been brought up differently to think of food as just 'fuel to keep going, keep living' sort of thing, and so, if they can have something they fancy, its no big deal if they do ?

    Its only guesswork on my part.

  10. #20
    Registered Guest PixieW's Avatar
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    I was the underweight child, teenager, young adult. I am not the over weight 50 year old. hey ho. With THD's help the last sentence will be untrue by the end of the year.

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