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Thread: Why are Brits fattest in Europe?

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    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    Default Why are Brits fattest in Europe?

    https://www.bbc.co.uk/food/articles/britain_diet
    You have to think that our national obsession with consuming the cheapest and quickest stuff we can find, preferably whilst in front of a screen might have some bearing? Plus you’d think someone would note the correlation between low fat recommendations and increasing waistlines over the last 40 years!

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    Also we no longer have proper lunch breaks, as mentioned. Men use to go home for lunch, normally cooked, or take a packed lunch (sandwiches, cake and/or fruit) sit outside or in a canteen with fellow workers and have an 1 hour for lunch. Women did the same if still living at home with parents. No one grabbed food and ate at their desk or walking down the road whilst shopping at lunch time.

    There were also no snacks in between meals until the invention of the tea trolley which lead to biscuits, cakes, chocolate bars being taken around as well both in factories and offices.

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    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    As teenagers, in school holidays, we were expected to take turns getting a cooked dinner (lunch to the posh) on the table for 12.50 when my dad got home, and he’d eat and go back to work around 2pm. To be honest, he couldn’t travel the distance in the time these days, let alone eat! But it was jolly good training for me and my sister and brother, we all cook from scratch (though him cooking is a bit more of an event). And we learnt the basics, it was always meat and two veg and pudding. Even school dinners were a proper sit down meal, as opposed to a packed lunch.

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    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Barleycorn View Post
    Behind a paywall, but think I know where it's going. Add that to very densely populated cities (we rank pretty high on population density) and our infection rate and death toll is hardly surprising!

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    'Borrowed' it for you.

    UK's Covid death toll fuelled by its obesity problem, say experts


    Britain was found to have the third highest death rate in the world, and the fourth highest obesity rate
    By Laura Donnelly, Health Editor 3 March 2021 • 10:00pm

    The WHO has said the 'correlation between obesity and coronavirus mortality rates is clear' Credit: Dominic Lipinski,/PA

    Britain's Covid death toll has been fuelled by its obesity epidemic, experts have said, as global research finds nine in 10 fatalities occurred in countries with a weight problem.
    Britain was found to have the third highest death rate in the world and the fourth highest obesity rate, with more than than two in three adults overweight or obese.
    The study by the World Obesity Federation examined almost 100 countries and found that 2.2 million of 2.5 million deaths occurred in countries with high levels of obesity. Overall, death rates were found to be 10 times higher in countries where more than half the population was overweight.
    It found that not a single country with low levels of obesity had a coronavirus death rate higher than 10 per 100,000 population. No country with death rates above 100 per 100,000 had less than 50 per cent of its population overweight
    Obesity has already been found to increase the risk of death from Covid-19 by around 50 per cent, as well as increasing the risk of severe disease, and the World Health Organisation said the report should act as a "wake-up call" for governments to tackle their nations' obesity problems.

    The country with the lowest Covid death rate was Vietnam, which has one of the lowest levels of excess weight in its population, with 18 per cent overweight. Japan and Singapore were also singled out for their low levels of obesity and deaths from Covid.
    In 2008, Japan introduced the "Metabo law", which requires everyone between the ages of 40 and 74 to get annual measurements of their waist circumference. Employers of those with waistlines above approved limits are required to provide weight loss classes.
    Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, the director-general of the World Health Organisation, said: "This report must act as a wake-up call to governments globally. The correlation between obesity and mortality rates from Covid-19 is clear and compelling.
    "Investment in public health and coordinated, international action to tackle the root causes of obesity is one of the best ways for countries to build resilience in health systems post-pandemic. We urge all countries to seize this moment."
    Dr Tim Lobstein, the author of the report, senior policy adviser to the World Obesity Federation and visiting professor at the University of Sydney, said: "We now know that an overweight population is the next pandemic waiting to happen.
    "Look at countries like Japan and South Korea where they have very low levels of Covid-19 deaths as well as very low levels of adult obesity. They have prioritised public health across a range of measures, including population weight, and it has paid off in the pandemic.
    "Governments have been negligent and ignored the economic value of a healthy population at their peril. For the last decade they have failed to tackle obesity, despite setting themselves targets at United Nations meetings.”
    Johanna Ralston, the chief executive of the World Obesity Federation, said: "The failure to address the root causes of obesity over many decades is clearly responsible for hundreds of thousands of preventable deaths."
    Tom Watson, the former deputy leader of the Labour Party, who lost eight stone and reversed type two diabetes and has become an anti-obesity campaigner, said: "This report is sobering. Again and again, public health experts shouted from the rooftops about the risks of obese populations.
    Tom Watson said 'failure to keep pubic policy promises on tackling obesity has cost many lives' Credit: Leon Neal/Getty Images
    "Failure to keep pubic policy promises on tackling obesity has cost many lives. It's a stern message for grieving families and people who have lost jobs and income to hear: much this crisis was preventable. Surely now, the lesson for post-pandemic Britain is a massive shakeup to public health policy?"
    The report also suggests the economic costs of preventing health services being over-run through lockdowns could have been significantly mitigated if governments had tackled population weight issues before the pandemic.
    The International Monetary Fund has projected that the world will lose $28 trillion in economic output worldwide up to 2025, as a result of health problems. Of this, at least $6 trillion will be directly attributable to the issue of populations living with excess weight, researchers said.

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    Maybe the exception that proves the rule but Australia's death rate of 35.84 per million population with obesity rates of about 67% - much the same as the UK from a very quick google search.
    Sue - the first "no thank you" is the easiest

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    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    Australia's lockdown has been among the more severe, though - and population density outside the major cities is pretty low.

    On a facetious note, I am sure Tom Watson didn't really mention 'pubic promises' - the mind boggles!

    What worries me most is that obesity will continue to be blamed on our lack of willpower, any government initiative will be Coca Cola led (insert vested interest of choice), and we will continue down the low fat and emerging plant-based road, only even more so because they won't wake up and smell the coffee.

    Thanks for posting BC - I almost always find your posts very interesting.
    Last edited by Sarah(sjc); 5th March 2021 at 12:41 PM.

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    Club Member Babs's Avatar
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    At least one generation, in this country, has missed out on proper cookery lessons, both at school and at home. It's time to put it back on the timetable for everyone - male and female.

    Secondly, why are parents, nurseries, schools still being advised that children can't possibly survive without a snack between meals?

    The Mediterranean Diet is always held up as an example - I'm not sure that they do eat what is listed but, from what I have seen, they are prepared to spend a far higher proportion of their income on food and more of their time preparing it.

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    Club Plus Member Sarah(sjc)'s Avatar
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    The annoying thing about the Mediterranean diet is that when I am on holiday I am never, ever offered wholegrains - it's exclusively white bread and flour! Apart from that - love it to bits!

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